Logo

Stainless Welcome for Sports Fans


Posted 5 January 2001

Sports fans trekking to Melbourne's Colonial Stadium will enter the ground via a 200 metre long, 20 metre wide bridge shrouded in stainless.

The Bourke Street Pedestrian Bridge, which connects Spencer Street Station to the eastern entrance of the $460 million sporting arena, opened in March 2000, makes extensive use of stainless steel to stunning effect.

A 200 metre long canopy comprising 14 rolled cascading stainless steel sheets divided in sections by red coated curved steel antlers protects pedestrians queuing on the south side of the bridge. The antlers, made from carbon steel, provide lighting and primary support to the stainless steel canopy.

400 metres of stainless steel handrailing with balustrades run the length of each side of the bridge.

he bridge connects the Gateway to the east and adjacent Spencer Street Station and extends across the station to the West End Connection above North-South Road.

Pedestrians entering the 30 000 person capacity bridge on the station side are greeted by two red glass towers, large staircases and a crushed wall of stainless steel through which a ramp connects disabled access from street level to the bridge.

Wood Marsh, the firm commissioned to design the bridge, said stainless steel was chosen because of its appearance, low maintenance and longevity.

"With thousands of people expected to cross the bridge every time an event is on, we needed a material that would not only withstand this level of traffic, but would make an eye-catching entrance to the stadium."

"Stainless steel was the obvious material choice -it is durable, needs limited upkeep and achieved the look we were after."

The roof cladding consists of 20 tonnes of 1.6mm grade 316 stainless steel sheets rolled to a radius of approximately 325mm butt joined, with a No. 4 finish to both faces.

400 metres of 6 inch, Sched 40 grade 316 stainless steel pipe was used for the handrails, polished to a No. 4 finish.

The handrails were constructed at Shearform Industries' workshop and installed, invisibly fixed, on site. The roof cladding was fabricated and polished in the workshop and installed on site.

The roofing material was supplied by ASSDA member Atlas Steels (Australia) Pty Ltd, the handrails by ASSDA member Sandvik Australia.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 17, January 2001.

Lissel Pilcher