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Stainless frameless tankers make big Australian debut


Posted 1 October 2005

McColl's Transport carts a variety of chemicals such as caustic soda and formaldehyde. The tanker barrel has been wrapped and not rolled, with full length stainless steel sheets used to eliminated circumferential welds. There’s a new breed of tanker being put through its paces along Australia’s east coast carrying aggressive chemicals and class three petroleum products for McColl’s Transport.

 

Dandenong based tanker manufacturer, Marshall Lethlean, has constructed FACT, a Frameless Aggressive Chemical Tanker with some unique operating attributes.

Marshall Lethlean constructed the 25,800 litre, 11.5m long stainless steel tanker with a chassis that’s up to 300 kilos lighter than conventional full frame designs.

Carting a variety of chemicals for McColls, such as caustic soda, formaldehyde and methanol, the barrel has been wrapped and not rolled, using full length stainless sheets to eliminate circumferential welds, a feature unique to Marshall Lethlean stainless steel tankers.

ASSDA Major Sponsor, Atlas Specialty Metals, supplied grade 316 stainless steel sheet to Marshall Lethlean for the fabrication of what is believed to be the industry’s first frameless chemical tanker.

Finally, to give the tanker a bright, durable corrosion resistant finish, the coaming, chassis rails and tank rings were all electropolished by ASSDA member, MME Surface Finishing.

Orlando Iluffi, Marshall Lethlean’s Business Development Manager, says the FACT product was one of many new developments which will be released onto the market to better improve running costs and operating safety.

“We have worked on this new tanker in partnership with McColl’s for nearly two years just to get it right.McColl's Transport carts a variety of chemicals such as caustic soda and formaldehyde. The tanker barrel has been wrapped and not rolled, with full length stainless steel sheets used to eliminated circumferential welds.

“Along the way, we have been able to improve our engineering skills to the point that it has led us toward other new concepts which we are all equally excited about.”

In June 2005, the Frameless Aggressive Chemical Tanker prototype began a six month trial period to test for ‘accelerated durability’.

After three and half months of the trial, McColl’s Workshop Manager, Rob Harrison said the company intends to “buy the tanker after the period” has completed in late December 2005.

This article featured in Australian Stainless magazine - Issue 33, Spring 2005.